Tag Archives: National Security Agency

Cyber espionage and the case for the genetically modified state

Headquarters of the NSA at Fort Meade, Marylan...

Big data… big appetite. Getting ahead by any means… the survival instinct written in the DNA of nation-states. Image: Headquarters of the NSA at Fort Meade, Maryland.  (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

In a recent opinion piece in The Guardian, Professor John Naughton of the Open university argues that the biggest story to come out of the Snowden NSA revelations is that the days of the internet as a truly global network are numbered.

“It was always a possibility that the system would eventually be Balkanised, i.e. divided into a number of geographical or jurisdiction-determined subnets as societies such as China, Russia, Iran and other Islamic states decided that they needed to control how their citizens communicated”, writes Naughton. “Now, Balkanisation is a certainty”.

But is Balkanisation the big deal here? Do the NSA revelations actually change anything? Read more of this piece at DiploFoundation

Also, read this recent analysis piece in the New Zealand National Business Review by Line 21 Project coordinator, Nicholas Dynon: BRAND REPUTATION: Fonterra cast as fall guy


The Snowden Affair (Part 2): State capitalism through the Chinese dreamscape

In Part 1 of this blogpost I highlighted the ironies – or as one Chinese general put it, the ‘hypocritical behavior’ – that the Chinese press has identified in relation to US cyber espionage in the wake of the Snowden revelations.[1] In particular, the revelations suggest that ‘state capitalism’, or the government use of the private sector to achieve national interests, is a model as applicable to the USA as it is to China. I would suggest, however, that in all this there exists a still deeper irony that may be seen through the prism of the ‘Chinese dream’ – the much-hyped propaganda buzz term introduced last November by Chinese president Xi Jinping… read the rest of this post at Diplo Foundation

Chinese wall

Peering through tower ruins along China’s Great Wall (Photo credit: rvw)