Tag Archives: Chinese socialism

Civilisation-State: Modernising the Past to Civilise the Future in Jiang Zemin’s China

This research article by Nicholas Dynon in this April’s issue of the peer-reviewed China: an International Journal analyses the largely overlooked role of the Communist Party of China (CPC) in the promotion of “socialist spiritual civilisation” in contemporising the exemplary role of the Chinese state and in informing the state’s efforts to rehabilitate China’s cultural traditions.

Drawing material from handbooks, newspaper articles and posters published between 1996 and 2002, it may be argued that the ability of the Party to reclaim the achievement of “civilisation” as an ultimate goal in Chinese history has a direct impact on its continuing pursuit to underwrite its long-term legitimacy. The article departs from the existing scholarship to locate the CPC’s civilising discourses within an historical context that predates the apotheosis of the CPC itself and links them to the sacred mission of maintaining the Chinese civilisation-state.

Available here at Project Muse

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[Creating a civilised community – propaganda poster in a residential compound in Shawo, Beijing]

Dream of the Red Future: Will the Chinese Dream Become an Enduring Classic?

In a scene in Cao Xueqin’s epic 18th century classic, Dream of the Red Chamber, protagonist Baoyu drifts into a dream while in a courtly chamber. His unconscious journey takes him to the “land of illusion,” where the fairy, named Disenchantment, reveals the fates of several characters close to him.

John Minford, professor of Chinese at the Australian National University, suggests the underlying theme of this great work is one of “seeing through the Red Dust,” beyond the illusion of earthly “reality.” Richard J. Smith of Rice University notes its theme of the “interpenetration of reality and illusion,” and of true and false producing one another. Ultimately, the work is semi-autobiographical, and reflects lost dreams, particularly the waning fortunes of Cao Xueqin’s own family and, by extension, that of the Qing dynasty.

While perhaps seated in his chamber in Zhongnanhai, Chinese president Xi Jinping recently dreamt his own “Chinese Dream,” but rather than foretelling a future of ill-fortune and decay, this dream speaks of a China on the ascendancy and of the promise of national rejuvenation… read more at World Policy Blog

Dream of the Red Future: will the Chinese Dream become an enduring classic?

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